Posts tagged georges melies.

leastofthese:

The Astronomer’s Dream, is a 1898 French short black-and-white silent film, directed by Georges Méliès

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The Extraordinary Voyage (Serge Bromberg & Eric Lange, 2012)

Films in 2014—#005 The Extraordinary Voyage (Serge Bromberg & Eric Lange, 2012)

anyone know if buster keaton ever mentioned being aware of the cinema of georges melies? or vice versa? any bk/melies scholars out there know?

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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (Georges Melies, 1907)

Films in 2012 —#032 Georges Melies shorts program (c. 1896—1907)

Georges Melies

Just spent an hour listening to children who were born after 9/11 laugh at movies Georges Melies made over 100 years ago.

There is nothing better on this earth.

Pure joy.

Georges Melies shorts program @ The American Cinematheque ›

theloudestvoice:

Georges Méliès (December 8, 1861 - January 21, 1938) as the chemist in his film The India Rubber Head (The Man With the Rubber Head), 1901

IMDb:

“A chemist in his laboratory places upon a table his own head, alive; then fixing upon his head a rubber tube with a pair of bellows, he begins to blow with all his might. Immediately the head increases in size and continues to enlarge until it becomes truly colossal while making faces. The chemist, fearing to burst it, opens a cock in the tube. The head immediately contracts and resumes its original size. He then calls his assistant and informs him of his discovery. The assistant, wishing to experiment for himself, seizes the bellows and blows into the head with all his might. The head swells until it bursts with a crash, knocking over the two experimenters.”

View the entire film here.

Georges Méliès’ ice giant is still cinema’s coolest monster, almost 100 years later

In his 1912 silent film La Conquête du Pôle (“The Conquest of the Pole”), pioneering French director Georges Méliès introduced audiences to one of the most underrated monsters in movie history — the man-eating ice giant of the North Pole.

The film, which is based on Jules Verne’s 1866 novel The Adventures of Captain Hatteras, follows a trajectory similar to that of Méliès’s most famous film, 1902’s Le Voyage Dans La Lune, which drew inspiration from Verne’s From the Earth to the Moon. In La Conquête du Pôle, Professor Maboul (played by Méliès himself) leads an expedition to the North Pole, where his travelers run afoul of a hungry ice giant. Of course, Maboul’s crew’s first instinct is to pelt the creature with snowballs. Can you blame the giant for chowing down on them?

This scene is beyond awesome. I love how he slowly rises out of the ground like an old-school Nintendo boss. His gaze is so soulless and strange, and apparently he was a giant marionette.

You can watch the entire 30-minute film (including some gonzo flying sequences) over at Europa Film Treasures. Thanks for the link, Alain!

[Photo via MOMA]

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